Dear Friends - Maker of Heaven & Earth

We believe in one God,
the Father, the Almighty,
maker of heaven and earth,
of all that is, seen and unseen.

Last month I reflected on the ‘We’ in the Creed. This month we move onward in the words we say each Sunday. We proclaim God as Creator.

In your mind’s eye take a step back and look around you. What do you see. Friends and family? A house that is the result of God given craft and talent? And outside the window, trees turning yellow and brown, the busy streets. People who we may know or never meet, those too are made by God.

And what do we not see? We know we are made of many parts working together. Going smaller yet cells working together with bacteria that keep us healthy. Each of those made of molecules, atoms. And smaller than the atom the mysteries of the quantum world that Physicists yearn to understand. This too is made by God.

Beyond our immediate view there is our whole planet in all its wonder. A whole Solar system, orbiting a star we call the Sun. That solar system one of hundreds of billions in our galaxy. That galaxy one of 100 billion in the universe. This too is all made by God.

And here we go far beyond what we can see, the possibility that our universe may exist in a further realm of countless different universes, perhaps with their own laws of physics. This too is made by God.

And farther still, past the imaginings of our greatest scientists, there is what theologians call Heaven, the realm of Godself, a being that cannot be described as simply one person but is one God.

When we proclaim God as maker of Heaven and Earth we proclaim that God is beyond all human comprehension and language. And yet God makes, creates and meets with each of us.

Yet when we look at the world around us we see that there is pain, brokenness and confusion. Especially at this time of year we recall the effects of war, and remember those who have died. We understand that as human beings we hold responsibility for the falleness of creation, expressed in the scriptures in the story of Eden’s paradise lost. That story may seem hard to take literally, yet it is entirely possible that two peoples decision to reject God worked its way both backwards and forward through creation history. Stranger things happen in quantum physics!

But still we are left with question why God made a world that could fall? Perhaps it is only through our falleness that we can give birth to something greater. Jesus is recorded in Matthew 24:7+ saying:
For nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom, and there will be famines and earthquakes in various places. All these are but the beginning of the birth pains.

The image is of pain leading to something that is better and greater than that which was before. A new birth, and a new creation. Jesus too suffered those pains in an excruciating death on a cross. In the creed we end with the words:
We look for the resurrection of the dead, and the life of the world to come.

We don’t believe that heaven is all that follows this life. We believe that there will be a new heaven and a new earth, a new universe, perhaps a new multiverse. One that is not only as ours was supposed to be but beyond all that it could be. We may struggle to think of the resurrection of the dead as people being brought out of their graves, but the reality is far more marvellous: God reaching through time to remake all that has ever been to be all that it could be.

As you worship at All Saints and profess the creed I pray that God gives you a vision of that wonder and mystery,

Much love,

Fr. Eddie







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